Cool as a Cucumber

Southeast LibraryRead Feed

Cool as a Cucumber

Books to lower your temperature in the dog days of August

Has the sweltering heat and the stifling humidity been getting you down? A tall glass of ice water accompanied by one of these chilly reads will be sure to keep you cool!

For Young Readers (Pre-K to 3rd Grade)
 
Flora and the Penguin by Molly Idle
This wordless book is the second in Molly Idle’s Flora books. Parents and children can enjoy turning the flaps on this book together and talking about what is going on in the story. 
 
Bear & Hare: Snow! by Emily Gravett
Join Bear and Hare for a chilly adventure upon mounds of powdery and packable snow. Great for children who are just beginning to read, this book will keep your child thinking of wintery days to come.
 
Snow Music by Lynne Rae Perkins
Perkin’s picture book of visual poetry is a wonderful example of poetry in early literacy. The brief concrete poems in the book are coupled with snow scenes that children and their families can connect with nature and animals that they have seen during colder months.
 
The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats
In this classic Caldecott Award winner, Peter explores his snow covered neighborhood. This is a wonderful book for introducing children to creative play and has been loved by children for over half a century. 
 
For Older Children (3rd to 6th Grade)
 
Polar Bears Past Bedtime (Magic Tree House #12) by Mary Pope Osborne
Jack and Annie are back solving riddles for the enchantress librarian Morgan le Fay in the Arctic circles. Can they stay safe in the cold from dangerous animals and surroundings and earn their Master Librarian cards once and for all? Find out in this twelfth installment in the Magic Tree House Series. 
 
Greenglass House by Kate Milford
Milo is having a busier than expected during winter break at his family’s inn for smugglers. When he discovers a mysterious map and decides to find out where it leads and to whom it belongs, he runs into more trouble than he originally bargained for. This book won the 2014 Edgar Award for Best Juvenile Mystery.
 
The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
In this fantasy classic, the Pevensie children are sent to live with Professor Digory Kirke under Operation Pied Piper, the movement which evacuated hundreds of thousands of English children from major cities during World War II. While exploring the professor’s house they stumble upon an entrance to the magical world of Narnia, which has been thrust into an unending winter under the tyranny of Jadis the white witch. 
 
For Teens and Adults (7th Grade and up)
 
Shiver by Maggie Stiefvater
Minnesotan Grace Brisbane can’t keep her mind off the yellow eyed wolf that saved her from near death one frozen day in her youth. When her high school classmate dies from a wolf attack right as the weather turns cooler, Grace is forced to explore her own ties to the wolves and revisit her connection to her yellow eyed friend. This teen fantasy thriller captivates through action, romance, and a growing mystery.
 
Blankets by Craig Thompson
Thompson’s visual autobiography focuses on a series of formative seasons in the author’s life. From his youth to his first love, Thompson explores feelings and questions of self-identity, family relationships, faith, and loss through stunning black and white ink drawings.
 
The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey
In this novelization of a traditional Slavic folktale, Mabel and Jack have moved to Alaska as part of the U.S. government’s push to increase the territory’s population in the late 1910’s. On the precipice of a threatening winter, their lives suddenly change with the mysterious arrival of a child resembling one they crafted from the year’s first snow.  As they work to bring the unusual child into their small family, they experience the trials of family life and learn how to conquer the loneliness that had previously been rooted in their solitude.