Book Hill Talks - France Alive: A History Told Through Great Works of Art

Georgetown Library

Book Hill Talks - France Alive: A History Told Through Great Works of Art

Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017, 7 p.m.

Lecture N° 4 19th Century Paintings Part Two: Impressionist Painters: Friendship, Landscapes and Modern Life.

Guest Speaker - Vanessa Badré
 

In 1874 the work of a small group of outsider artists was brought together in an exhibit by the French photographer, Nadar. The exhibit caused a stir, and critics satirically baptized the group “Impressionists.” In time, derision changed to veneration as these artists—mostly French—moved toward the center of one of the great art movements in modern history. What was the social circle of these artists, collectors, and merchants like in the time of the exhibit, before their broad renown? Monet, Degas, Renoir, Cézanne, Pissaro, Durand-Ruel, and Caillebotte shared a rich and complex set of friendships and rivalries; they shared competition and inspiration, work and play. Some of their like-minded contemporaries refused to show in Nadar’s exhibit, while other artists whose work was far from Impressionism were included. Members of this circle worked together and shared the same taste for the villages around Paris, where the boats and bridges of the Seine became a common subject of their artwork. Collectively, they were fascinated by light and nature, and offered a bright new vision of the countryside, between water and fields. But, as the poet Baudelaire observed, they were also bewitched by "modern life" with its bustling towns and their buildings.

Add to Calendar 15-02-2017 19:00:00 15-02-2017 20:00:00 Book Hill Talks - France Alive: A History Told Through Great Works of Art Lecture N° 4 19th Century Paintings Part Two: Impressionist Painters: Friendship, Landscapes and Modern Life. Guest Speaker - Vanessa Badré   In 1874 the work of a small group of outsider artists was brought together in an exhibit by the French photographer, Nadar. The exhibit caused a stir, and critics satirically baptized the group “Impressionists.” In time, derision changed to veneration as these artists—mostly French—moved toward the center of one of the great art movements in modern history. What was the social circle of these artists, collectors, and merchants like in the time of the exhibit, before their broad renown? Monet, Degas, Renoir, Cézanne, Pissaro, Durand-Ruel, and Caillebotte shared a rich and complex set of friendships and rivalries; they shared competition and inspiration, work and play. Some of their like-minded contemporaries refused to show in Nadar’s exhibit, while other artists whose work was far from Impressionism were included. Members of this circle worked together and shared the same taste for the villages around Paris, where the boats and bridges of the Seine became a common subject of their artwork. Collectively, they were fascinated by light and nature, and offered a bright new vision of the countryside, between water and fields. But, as the poet Baudelaire observed, they were also bewitched by "modern life" with its bustling towns and their buildings. false DD/MM/YYYY