Story Tags

Adams Vs. Jefferson cover

Know Your Inaugurals

"The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."  "Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country." Some of the most stirring presidential quotes in this country's 240-year history come from inaugural addresses. Our library has some great books that are just devoted to the speeches and the events that surrounded them. Check one out and relive some of the best speeches in American history.   All I'm saying is that the next president has a lot to live up to come January 20.  

Podcast: The History and Politics of Gentrification in Mt. Pleasant

Know Your Neighborhood Podcast Now Streaming

The History and Politics of Gentrification in Mt. Pleasant - Podcast now streaming!

Washington Blade first issue, October 1969

The Washington Blade issues 1969-1982 now online

Digitization partnership with historic gay newspaper goes live

Digitized issues from the first decade and a half of The Washington Blade newspaper are now online in Dig DC, DC Public Library Special Collections' home for digitized materials. The collection contains digitized editions of the newspaper from 1969 to 1982 and is presented in partnership with The Blade.

Gibbs

"The Crisis in Black Education"

Black History Month Lecture Series with C. R. Gibbs

C. R. Gibbs, author and researcher will give a series of two lectures at four DC Public Library's during Black History Month in February 2017. His topics will focus on the theme of "The Crisis in Black Education"  and what historical impact it has had on Washington DC and beyond.

Alice, Dorothy, Euince, and Helen Shaed

The Shaed Sisters of Washington, D.C.

Elementary School Educators

The Shaeds were a prominent family of educators and professionals in Washington, D.C. Gregory and Cenos Shaed moved from Florida to Washington, D.C. after their marriage in 1900, where Mr. Shaed became a printer with the Government Printing Office.

African American History Culture Museum cover

Staff Pick: National Museum of African American Museum & Culture

New in the collection

The Smithsonian's newest museum, the National Museum of African American History and Culture, is now open to the public!

Obama Master Reading List 2008-2016

One thing I'm going to miss about President Obama: the man reads.  The busiest man in the world still makes time to read.  He is a role model for us all.  He reads good stuff too. So in honor of the Reader-in-Chief, I have compiled a master list of all the books that the president was reported to have read from 2008 until the present. Please let me know if I have missed any.    2016

Woodridge Community

"Know Your Neighborhood Series-Woodridge," Part I

Panel discussion,“Woodridge: Conversations with the Community on the History, People, Resources and Future of a Magnificent Community in NE,Washington, DC.

Join the community, neighbors and friends at the Woodridge Library and Friends Book Club Kick -Off, for a panel discussion, “Woodridge: Conversations with the Community on the History, People, Resources and Future of a Magnificent Community in NE, Washington, DC.

Marvin Jones photo

Aunt Betty and Fort Stevens

Local film producer Marvin T. Jones will screen his documentary "Aunt Betty and Fort Stevens," telling the story of Elizabeth Proctor Thomas, a free African-American woman who owned land in Washington, D.C., the story of a free woman of color who, despite losing her farm during the Civil War, becomes a heroine in her Washington, D.C. community.  At one the worst moments in her life she was comforted by Abraham Lincoln.

A crowd at the Howard Theater, 1970s

U Street Oral History Project now online

Interviews tell the story of DC's cultural corridor

Now online: our U Street Oral History Project, which gathers first-hand accounts of the historic U Street Corridor neighborhood from its heyday as “Black Broadway” in the 1920s and 1930s through the riots that devastated the area following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., to the present renewal.

Pages