Black History in Your Neighborhood

Black History in Your Neighborhood

        Local Black History

Explore black history in your own backyard this Black History Month.

We will share one black history fact per day about a neighborhood library, covering all 25 branches and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Learn more about the rich history of DC Public Library and the African American men and women who helped to shape the libraries and surrounding communities.

February 17
Local Black History

A historic African American burial ground is located on Chain Bridge Road in the Palisades Neighborhood where in the 1800s there was a large black community. The cemetery was started by the Union Burial Society of Georgetown and is maintained by descendants of the original association members.

February 16
Local Black History
Cathy Hughes, the founder of Radio One, purchased her first radio station in 1979, WOL-AM and moved it to 4th and H Streets NE in 1985 and remained at that location for 10 years. In 2015 the intersection was named in her honor.

February 15
Local Black History
Local architects Bryant and Bryant designed the current Lamond-Riggs Library in 1979. The $2M library opened in 1983. Both Bryant brothers, Charles and Robert are now deceased and their legacy lives on through Charles Bryant II, also an architect.

February 14
Local Black History
The Peabody Room at Georgetown Library is home to a portrait of Yarrow Mamout, a muslim slave, freed in 1796 who became a landowner and celebrity in Georgetown. The portrait, painted by James Alexander Simpson was on display the National Portrait Gallery from 2016-2019.

February 13
Local Black History

Francis A .Gregory, was a local public servant and the first black president of the DC Public Library Board of Trustees lived in the Fort Davis, southeast neighborhood. A new library was built to honor Francis A. Gregory Library and opened in June 2012 which continues to celebrate his legacy from its initial dedication in 1986.

February 12
Local Black History
Activist Nannie Helen Burroughs was a resident of the Deanwood community and founder of the National Training School for Women and Girls established in 1909.

February 11
Local Black History
Captain George Pointer was a slave born in 1773. He bought his freedom at the age of 17 and worked for the Potomac Company rising to Superintendent Engineer. His descendants have been displaced many times, including Mary Moten, who lived on property that was taken by eminent domain to create the Alice Deal Junior High and Woodrow Wilson Senior High Schools.

February 10
Local Black History
In 1961, Maria Trotter, a 10-year-old resident of the Capitol View neighborhood, read a letter before the Senate Appropriations Committee asking for the money to build the much-needed library. "If we read more," she wrote, "we might become teachers, doctors, chemists or other useful men and women...Sincerely, Children of Capitol View Area."

February 9
Local Black History
Benning Library officially opened as Dorothy I Height/Benning Library on April 5, 2010, in honor of the civil rights icon who was a leader in addressing the rights of both women and African Americans as The president of the National of Negro Women.

February 8
Local Black History
William O. Lockridge was an education and community activist dedicated to improving the lives of Distrcit residents. Lockridge served on the DC Board of Education where he advocated for the children of Ward 8. The library was named in his honor in June 2012.

February 7
Local Black History
Marilyn Bryant volunteers with I Vote. Founded in 1976, I Vote was an organization focused on get-out-the-vote efforts. An article on the organization appears in the Evening Star, September 6, 1978, page 65.

February 6
Local Black History

The Walker Jones School, collocated with the Northwest One Library, is partially named for James Edward Walker who was a teacher and principal for DC Public Schools in the late 1800s and early 1900s. He was also a member of the D.C. National Guard during WWI.

February 5
Local Black History
Artist Allen Uzikee Nelson has lived in the Petworth and Columbia Heights neighborhoods for more than five decades. His works, both large and small, dot the city, including pieces that honor Thurgood Marshall, Marcus Garvey, Malcolm X and the multi-hyphen great Paul Robeson. The Petworth neighborhood is home to "Here I Stand In the Spirit of Paul Robeson."

February 4
Local Black History

In 1854, the Anacostia neighborhood prohibited the sale, rental or lease of property to anyone of African or Irish descent. The population of the neighborhood was drastically different by 1970s, becoming majority black. The Anacostia Library changed to accomodate the community, including the initiation of Minority Enterprise Week in 1972.

February 3
Local Black History
Artist and community activist Lou Stovall is a Cleveland Park resident and several of his paintings can be found hanging near the entrance of Cleveland Park Library.

February 2
 MLK and Marian Anderson
The groundbreaking of the central library later named in honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., commenced two months after Dr. King's assassination in July 1968. The dedication of the library did not occur until one month after the library's opening in August 1972. 

February 1        
 MLK and Marian Anderson

Martin Luther King Jr. saw singer Marian Anderson perform at the Lincoln Memorial as a 10-year-old boy. Twenty-four years later he would stand in her spot and give the "I have a dream" speech. As a child he said in a speaking contest “She sang as never before, with tears in her eyes. When the words of ‘America’ and ‘Nobody Knows de Trouble I Seen’ rang out over that great gathering, there was a hush on the sea of uplifted faces, Black and white, and a new baptism of liberty, equality, and fraternity.” See an exhibition exploring her life and work as a civil rights activist at The National Portrait Gallery near the Martin Luther King Jr. Library.