Soon to be Seen on the Silver Screen

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Soon to be Seen on the Silver Screen

Upcoming Book-to-Film Adaptations

'Tis the season for Oscar bait and awards chatter and what’s a tried and true strategy for catching the eye of the Academy? Literary adaptations, of course! And we all know it’s better to read the book first, so here are a few big name adaptations coming soon to a theater near you - and one soon-to-be-dropped on Netflix.
 
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick
January 2021. Rick Deckard has a license to kill. His current mission? To hunt down several rogue androids intermingling amongst the thousands and thousands of humans. But these androids are near-perfect in their ability to imitate human beings, including their appearance, and they have no intention of being found. Acclaimed science fiction author Philip K. Dick tackles programming and ethical quandaries alike in this eerie and strange tale. What would happen if androids were capable of empathy and the ability to understand the meaning of life and death? Would they seek to avoid death at all costs? Will self-aware A.I.s view humans as a threat to their own survival? And if so, what does that mean for us? A quick Google search will tell you that the quest for intelligent android life is progressing in leaps and bounds, so these questions may not be merely speculative for that much longer. Loosely adapted into the 1982 film Blade Runner starring Harrison Ford, Androids will see more of its themes developed in the long-awaited sequel to the film, Blade Runner 2049 starring Ford and Ryan Gosling, in theaters October 6.
 
The Anatomy of Motive: The FBI’s Legendary Mindhunter Explores the Key to Understanding and Catching Violent Criminals by John E. Douglas & Mark Olshaker
 John E. Douglas was one of the nation’s first criminal profilers, responsible for the creation of the F.B.I.’s Criminal Profiling Program, and was later promoted to Unit Chief of the Investigative Support Unit. Throughout his career, he interviewed some of the most notorious serial killers and violent offenders in recent history, including Ted Bundy, John Wayne Gacy, Charles Manson, and David Berkowitz. His findings helped advance criminal psychology and law enforcement. Much of his work and research is chronicled here, as well as in his other works, which will all serve as the basis for the new Netflix drama Mindhunter, a fictionalized series following two detectives interviewing imprisoned mass murderers, arsonists, and bombers in the hunt to better understand the minds of those who commit atrocities against strangers, and to aid in the capture of future perpetrators. The first season drops in its entirety on Netflix streaming October 13.
 
The Snowman by Jo Nesbø
Oslo in November. The first snow of the season has fallen. A boy named Jonas wakes in the night to find his mother gone. Out his window, in the cold moonlight, he sees the snowman that inexplicably appeared in the yard earlier in the day. Around its neck is his mother’s pink scarf. Detective Harry Hole suspects a link between a menacing letter he’s received and the disappearance of Jonas’s mother - and of perhaps a dozen other women, all of whom went missing on the day of a first snowfall. As his investigation deepens, something else emerges: he is becoming a pawn in an increasingly terrifying game whose rules are devised - and constantly revised - by the killer. Those Scandinavian crime writers really know how to get under the skin, and Nesbø is one of the best in the game. Though it’s the seventh in the Harry Hole series, The Snowman can be read as a stand-alone. The nail-biting suspense and taut writing make the pages fly by; very easy to finish in time for the film version, starring Michael Fassbender and Rebecca Ferguson, out in theaters October 20.
 
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
Just after midnight, a snowdrift halts the luxurious and decadent Orient Express dead in its tracks. The lavish train is unusually full for the time of year, but by morning, there is one less passenger. There’s been a murder. And a strange one at that. Someone has been stabbed a dozen times in their compartment, with the door locked from the inside. Fortunately, or perhaps unfortunately for the guilty party, master detective Hercule Poirot is on the scene to solve this famous head-scratcher from the queen of crime, Agatha Christie. This is a great, intricate, and twisty novel with an ending very few see coming. It’s been adapted to radio, TV, and film before, with the latest adaptation in theaters on November 10 and starring a whole host of stars, including Johnny Depp, Judi Dench, and Kenneth Branagh as Poirot.
 
Call Me by Your Name by André Aciman
During a long, languid summer in the Italian Riviera, romance blossoms between seventeen-year-old Elio and twenty-four-year-old Oliver. Oliver is a graduate student staying at his family's villa to help Elio's father, a professor, compile his research. Both a compelling story richly told and a poetic testament to the beauty of language, Aciman’s novel is a tribute to passion, sensation, and desire. It's not a sentimental romance, but a grounded look at the mechanics of early desire and obsession. Elio and Oliver second-guess, manipulate, stall, and play games with each other, yet for all that, there's great emotional depth achieved. The sensual, lush depictions of the Mediterranean coast in summer and the buildup of tension between the two men creates an intriguing parallel. A novel for anyone who has ever had to navigate the strange waters between something they both want to obtain and fear to have. Look for the buzzworthy film, starring Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet, in theaters Thanksgiving weekend.