The Great Oscar Nominee Book Swap

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The Great Oscar Nominee Book Swap

Like this movie? Try reading this...

Who doesn’t love a great story? Whether it’s told on the page or on the screen, there’s nothing quite like curling up under a fuzzy blanket, popping some popcorn and falling into a well-told tale. Or sharing an epic cinematic experience in a dark movie theater. The best movies can inspire a fervent passion for similar storytelling and luckily, this year’s most buzzworthy films have plenty of read-alikes out there, whether you’re craving more guerrilla journalism, World War II heroism, or the awkward bumblings of life and love as a teenager. This year’s nominations for Best Picture at the 90th Academy Awards have deep literary roots on their own merits—The Post is inspired by the bestselling memoir Personal History by Katharine Graham (played by Meryl Streep in the film), The Shape of Water is getting a novelized treatment this month and Call Me By Your Name is based on the novel of the same title. Here are some other books you might enjoy based on a few Oscar-nominated films of 2017:
 
If you liked The Post, try reading…
All the President’s Men by Carl Bernstein & Bob Woodward
The full account of the Watergate scandal, teased at the very end of The Post, told from the two Washington Post reporters that broke the story. Published two months before Richard Nixon’s resignation, All the President’s Men revealed the full scope of the scandal and cover-up that would bring down a president and introduced the mysterious “Deep Throat” to readers for the first time. Starting with what appeared to be a simple burglary at the Democratic headquarters and progressing through the increasingly twisted headlines, Woodward and Bernstein piece together the Watergate puzzle that won them a Pulitzer, inspired generations of young journalists and toppled the “the chief.” Their account reads like a thrilling detective story and, as a bonus, was adapted into its own Oscar-nominated film starring Dustin Hoffman and Robert Redford in 1976.
 
If you liked Dunkirk, try reading…
Band of Brothers: E company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne from Normandy to Hitler’s Eagle’s Nest by Stephen E. Ambrose
An accomplished rifle company, the Easy Company, 506th Airborne Division, US Army, kept getting tough assignmentsresponsible for everything from parachuting into France early D-Day morning to the capture of Hitler's Eagle's Nest at Berchtesgaden. In Band of Brothers, Stephen Ambrose introduces the reader to the everyday men in this brave unit who fought, starved and suffered loss together in unimaginable circumstances; a company that had to endure savage casualties and were all awarded Purple Hearts, which they famously considered “badges of office.” Drawing on hours of interviews with survivors as well as the soldiers' journals and letters, Stephen Ambrose recounts the stories, often in the men's own words, of these impressive American heroes, whose stories are just as harrowing as the interwoven tales played out in Christopher Nolan’s film. You can also find the acclaimed HBO miniseries in our collection to visually accompany your history lesson.
 
If you liked Call Me By Your Name, try reading…
Maurice by E.M. Forster
From the author of Howards End and A Passage to India, Maurice was completed in 1914 but remained unpublished, at Forster’s request, until 1971. It follows the title character, a man heartbroken over unrequited love, who opens his heart and his mind to questions about his sexual identity. In order to be true to himself, Maurice must go against the grain of society’s unspoken yet firm rules concerning class, wealth, education and politics. Just as Elio must grapple with a burgeoning attraction he cannot quite define in CMBYN, so too does Maurice learn to navigate hidden corners of his heart and make a decision that could drastically alter his life forever. This beautiful novel is an homage to love of all kinds and a celebration of the unique and often challenging journey same-sex couples must take in order to find happiness in the wider world. It boasts several successful stage adaptations as well as an Oscar-nominated 1987 film starring Hugh Grant and James Wilby.
 
If you liked Get Out, try reading…
Lovecraft Country by Matt Ruff
Cult novelist Matt Ruff makes visceral the terrors of life in Jim Crow America and its lingering effects in a brilliant and wondrous work  that melds historical fiction, pulp noir and Lovecraftian horror. Chicago, 1954: When his father Montrose goes missing, 22-year-old army veteran Atticus Turner embarks on a road trip to New England to find him, accompanied by his Uncle George, publisher of The Safe Negro Travel Guide, and his childhood friend Letitia. On their journey to the lavish manor of Mr. Braithwhite, heir to the estate that owned Atticus’s great grandmother, they encounter both mundane terrors of white America and malevolent spirits that seem straight out of the weird tales George devours. Using a blend of horror, magic, power, hope and freedommuch in the same way that Jordan Peele’s acclaimed film didLovecraft Country is a devastating portrait of racism—a terrifying specter that haunts us still today. Fun fact: Peele and J.J. Abrams are set to adapt the novel for HBO in 2018.
 
If you liked Lady Bird, try reading…
Where’d You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple
Bernadette Fox is notorious. To her Microsoft-guru husband, she's a fearlessly opinionated partner; to fellow private-school mothers in Seattle, she's a disgrace; to design mavens, she's a revolutionary architect and to 15-year-old Bee, she is a best friend and, simply, Mom. Then Bernadette disappears. To find her mother, Bee compiles email messages, official documents, secret correspondencecreating a compulsively readable and touching novel about misplaced genius and a mother and daughter's role in an absurd world. Matching the dry humor and down-to-earth sensibilities of Greta Gerwig’s critical darling, Where’d You Go, Bernadette is the perfect companion piece to the quirky satire of Lady Bird. Plus, you’ll want to read it before the movie adaptation, directed by Richard Linklater, is released this May.