Mysteries Featuring Famous Authors

Read Feed

Mysteries Featuring Famous Authors

Authors aren't always confined to being behind the scenes of a mystery. Sometimes they take center stage as the sleuth. Check out these historical mysteries that feature well-known authors as the amateur detectives intent on solving murders instead of writing about them.

The Dante Club by Matthew Pearl – Matthew Pearl’s first novel, The Dante Club, features a group of America’s historic literary starsHenry Wadsworth Longfellow, Oliver Wendell Holmes, James Russell Lowell and J. T. Fieldsas they try to solve a series of murders based on Dante’s Inferno. Their involvement is necessitated by the fact that they are the experts on the literary work and so are the ones who have realized the connection between The Inferno and the murders but would therefore be the first suspects if that knowledge became public.
 
Murder as a Fine Art by David Morrell – The first book in a trilogy, Murder as a Fine Art follows infamous author Thomas de Quincey and his daughter Emily as they attempt to clear de Quincey of suspicion for a recent set of murders in Victorian London that copy a murder featured in de Quincey's essay. Morrell creates such an atmospheric setting that London is nearly another character in the book. Aiding the father-daughter duo are two members of the relatively new Scotland Yard.
 
Jane and the Unpleasantness at Scargrave Manor by Stephanie Barron – The first in a fairly long-running cozy mystery series, Barron writes a Jane Austen that is a cross between Sherlock Holmes and Miss Marple. Upon arriving at Scargrave Manor to visit her friend, the new Countess of Scargrave, Austen is almost immediately thrown into a murder investigation to save her friend’s reputation.
 
Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance by Gyles Brandreth – This Victorian mystery features not only Oscar Wilde but also Arthur Conan Doyle and poet and Wilde biographer Robert Sherard. The three join forces to investigate the murder of Billy Woodonly to find that there is very little evidence at the murder scene. But if the police will not investigate the murder, Wilde is determined to find out what happened while his friends dubiously assist his exploits.
 
The Highwayman and Mr. Dickens by William Palmer – Palmer couches this novel as the diary of mystery novelist Wilkie Collins, making him Charles Dickens’ de facto Watson. The novelists, along with real-life Scotland Yard Inspector Fields, investigate the murder of a lady and her servant in an attempt to prove the innocence of actor Tally Ho Thompson. Historical and literary details abound in this historical mystery.