Hunger Wall Poster Making Workshop

Petworth Library

Hunger Wall Poster Making Workshop

Saturday, July 14, 2018, 1 p.m.

Join activist and artist Omolara Williams McCallister to create original posters in this hands-on workshop, incorporating imagery from the Poor People’s Campaign Collection in DC Public Library's Special Collections. In 1968, residents and visitors in Resurrection City drew and painted on a temporary plywood wall to express messages of solidarity among different races, cultures and regions of the country in the human rights struggle. Inspired by the Resurrection City mural, which bore the message “Hunger’s Wall: Tell it Like it Is,” our artists have created poster-making kits allowing visitors to combine activist imagery from 1968 with their own messages for 2018. 
 
Omolara Williams McCallister  (she/her or love/beloved) is a textile and mixed media artist whose practice revolves around using art as a tool for social change. While her studio work contemplates the ways that individuals’ identities and bodies are politicized through social interaction her public work engages everyday folks in organizing their communities for social change. Omolara has  exhibited work at the Honfleur Gallery and Joan Hisaoka Healing Arts Gallery, and has forthcoming installations at the Greenbelt Recreation Center and Washington Project for the Arts. Omolara has led workshops and lectures on art and social change for the National Museum of African American History and Culture, US Department of State, George Washington University, Maryland Institute College of the Arts ( MICA), and Howard School of Social Work among others. Omolara is an MFA candidate in the MICA community arts program.
 
Learn more about The People's University celebrating the 50th Anniversary of 1968 here.

Add to Calendar 14-07-2018 13:00:00 14-07-2018 14:00:00 Hunger Wall Poster Making Workshop Join activist and artist Omolara Williams McCallister to create original posters in this hands-on workshop, incorporating imagery from the Poor People’s Campaign Collection in DC Public Library's Special Collections. In 1968, residents and visitors in Resurrection City drew and painted on a temporary plywood wall to express messages of solidarity among different races, cultures and regions of the country in the human rights struggle. Inspired by the Resurrection City mural, which bore the message “Hunger’s Wall: Tell it Like it Is,” our artists have created poster-making kits allowing visitors to combine activist imagery from 1968 with their own messages for 2018.    Omolara Williams McCallister  (she/her or love/beloved) is a textile and mixed media artist whose practice revolves around using art as a tool for social change. While her studio work contemplates the ways that individuals’ identities and bodies are politicized through social interaction her public work engages everyday folks in organizing their communities for social change. Omolara has  exhibited work at the Honfleur Gallery and Joan Hisaoka Healing Arts Gallery, and has forthcoming installations at the Greenbelt Recreation Center and Washington Project for the Arts. Omolara has led workshops and lectures on art and social change for the National Museum of African American History and Culture, US Department of State, George Washington University, Maryland Institute College of the Arts ( MICA), and Howard School of Social Work among others. Omolara is an MFA candidate in the MICA community arts program.   Learn more about The People's University celebrating the 50th Anniversary of 1968 here. false DD/MM/YYYY