Nathalie V. Black Book Discussion Series: American Autobiography

Cleveland Park Library

Nathalie V. Black Book Discussion Series: American Autobiography

Next date: Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019, 7 p.m. (see all dates)

This fall the Cleveland Park Library will host the Nathalie V. Black Book Discussion Series, “American Autobiography: From Colonial to Contemporary Times” led by resident scholar, Philip Burnham, associate professor in the English Department at George Mason University. The series will look at how the style and themes of American narratives have evolved over the span of several centuries.  Readings include personal accounts by a Founding Father, an African American activist, a Native American medicine man and the first Hispanic member of the Supreme Court.  To register, please e-mail cplbookseries@gmail.com.

The series is made possible by the generous support of the Friends of the Cleveland Park Library. 

The schedule is as follows:
October 11 --The Autobiography, by Benjamin Franklin
The godfather of the American life narrative, Benjamin Franklin was prominent among our Founding Fathers for his wide-ranging talents, his commitment to public service, and his wry (and sometimes bawdy) sense of humor.  His life story is the classic telling of the self-made American--and in prose that’s still readable today!
 
November 29 -- I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou
Published in 1969, Angelou’s first of many autobiographies charts her childhood and adolescence through the Great Depression and World War II. This moving account is an intimate memoir about survival in the segregated South and the changes wrought by the Great Migration for many African American families.
 
December 13 -- My Beloved World, by Sonia Sotomayor
The daughter of Puerto Rican immigrants, Sonia Sotomayor was raised in a tough neighborhood in the south Bronx before going on to study at Princeton and Yale and being appointed to the federal bench. This is a frank account of her struggle with diabetes, her difficult but supportive family, and the continuing controversy over affirmative action, all of which illuminate the early years of one of our most important public figures.
 
January 10 -- Lame Deer, Seeker of Visions, by John Fire Lame Deer
An outspoken Lakota Sioux medicine man from South Dakota, John Lame Deer does not fit the usual profile of a “great American.”  But this ‘community autobiography’ breaks the mold of the genre as we know it. By turns reverent and profane, amusing and grim, eager and disparaging, Lame Deer calls into question many of the “pull yourself up by your bootstraps” assumptions so common in American writing.
 
FREE | Open to the public 

Add to Calendar 09-01-2019 19:00:00 09-01-2019 20:00:00 Nathalie V. Black Book Discussion Series: American Autobiography This fall the Cleveland Park Library will host the Nathalie V. Black Book Discussion Series, “American Autobiography: From Colonial to Contemporary Times” led by resident scholar, Philip Burnham, associate professor in the English Department at George Mason University. The series will look at how the style and themes of American narratives have evolved over the span of several centuries.  Readings include personal accounts by a Founding Father, an African American activist, a Native American medicine man and the first Hispanic member of the Supreme Court.  To register, please e-mail cplbookseries@gmail.com. The series is made possible by the generous support of the Friends of the Cleveland Park Library.  The schedule is as follows: October 11 --The Autobiography, by Benjamin Franklin The godfather of the American life narrative, Benjamin Franklin was prominent among our Founding Fathers for his wide-ranging talents, his commitment to public service, and his wry (and sometimes bawdy) sense of humor.  His life story is the classic telling of the self-made American--and in prose that’s still readable today!   November 29 -- I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou Published in 1969, Angelou’s first of many autobiographies charts her childhood and adolescence through the Great Depression and World War II. This moving account is an intimate memoir about survival in the segregated South and the changes wrought by the Great Migration for many African American families.   December 13 -- My Beloved World, by Sonia Sotomayor The daughter of Puerto Rican immigrants, Sonia Sotomayor was raised in a tough neighborhood in the south Bronx before going on to study at Princeton and Yale and being appointed to the federal bench. This is a frank account of her struggle with diabetes, her difficult but supportive family, and the continuing controversy over affirmative action, all of which illuminate the early years of one of our most important public figures.   January 10 -- Lame Deer, Seeker of Visions, by John Fire Lame Deer An outspoken Lakota Sioux medicine man from South Dakota, John Lame Deer does not fit the usual profile of a “great American.”  But this ‘community autobiography’ breaks the mold of the genre as we know it. By turns reverent and profane, amusing and grim, eager and disparaging, Lame Deer calls into question many of the “pull yourself up by your bootstraps” assumptions so common in American writing.   FREE | Open to the public  false DD/MM/YYYY