Comments from the Oct. 23, 2018 meeting

Comments from the Oct. 23, 2018 meeting

Lamond-Riggs Community Meeting
Oct. 23, 2018
Break Out Session Questions and Answers
 
The attendees were broken into four focus groups.  Each group had a facilitator and a note taker. 
 
Question 1: What role should the Lamond-Riggs Library play in this community?
  • A gathering place – where community can get work done, relax, connect
  • Inspire and support learning – especially lifelong learning.
  • Access to information that is not available at home.
  • Focus on learning and communication at all levels – levels being age and levels being ability.
  • A community asset – an amenity that will be a beacon and place to be proud of
  • A community hub where things come together
  • A place that can stand alone without additional support from other facilities
  • Study halls and dedicated space for kids from local schools to do homework
  • Part of the community fabric, integrated into the community and able to offer more programming
  • A place to distribute information
  • Library loan systems – to share books from other libraries and to ensure that people unable to come to this building can receive books at home.
  • Meeting space for adult and continuing education
  • A place for information – I work in the public schools and I see many instances when our children need a place where they can get information that’s not available to them at home – books, papers, information
  • A place for everybody - people in this community fought really hard for a library in the first place – I’d like it to continue to serve EVERYBODY – continue to be a place for the seniors but also a place for the young families in the neighborhood. This library is doing a good job - you see old guys teaching young guys to play chess. Teenagers back in the teen corner doing god knows what but at least they’re quiet which is all the rest of us seem to care about.
  • A neighborhood hub – a place for information, a place for meetings, a place where we can read, find new books, meet friends – I use this library but I’d like to see it do more. 
  • The Cafritz Foundation is developing the property across the street and it will impact this library – it will have all sorts of arts activities, a children’s museum, media entertainment, theatres, maybe this place should be the quiet place across from the noisy place?
  • Maybe the library could collaborate with the artists from across the street?
  • The building has a good elevator we can move around once we’re in the building but you know the seniors are not going to walk all the up here from the subway. What looks easy to younger people can be difficult for older ones. For some of the old folks walking even a few blocks can be impossible. I know you don’t want to hear this but we NEED more parking spaces
  • A space that will allow for STEM programming. Think about entry/exit points. It should be a safe space for children. Does not have to be designated just for STEM.
  • Even though across the street there will be an arts space STEM is still needed
  • e.g., robotics, computer programming … will there be ethernet ports, etc. to facilitate STEM activities?
  • Security - consider what’s nearby re: traffic (e.g., bathroom that may attract foot-traffic from adults)
  • A community meeting space.  It should be an oasis for the community. It’s welcoming for many groups. A place for relaxation. (reading for some)
  • It should accommodate different age groups, different programming
  • A beacon - whether it’s book club, bridge club - whatever the community needs, the library should be a beacon.
  • A place for relaxation while you’re reading. Maybe not a meeting room. Some place like a coffee shop.  “like the old Barnes and Noble; you knew there was coffee there.”
  • Play space for kids. A place where little kids who can’t be quiet can have their own space to play and be excited. A place for kids when it’s not story time and where the kids won’t disrupt everyone else like the Chevy Chase Library.
  • It may not be just for small children. A place for louder play in general.
  • A place to teach history, technical classes (computer, STEM, how to do something technical like web designer)
  • Newer machinery
  • School partnerships
    • Kids know the library and their school are working hand and hand
  • Welcoming
    • Add beauty to the neighborhood
    • Safe place outside school hours
  • Community – The public square
    • Be around each other
    • Enrichments – concerts, talks, events
    • Meeting spaces for up to 100 people
    • Destination – space to relax by yourself
    • Peer to peer recommendations on books to read
  • Center for Learning
    • Lifelong learners – all ages can get new skills
    • Conduit for information
    • Bridge digital divide
    • Classes
  • A place for discovery
    • Inspire kids
    • Explore
Question 2: What one word would you use to describe the feeling you want to have when you walk into the new Lamond-Riggs Library for the first time?
  • Here / Place – I want to be here and not distracted by outside activities (sense of place)
  • Quiet – able to concentrate
  • Bright – want natural light, place that does not feel claustrophobic, want to stay.
  • Inspired – want to come here to feel ready to tackle that task
  • Awed – more than the routine, feeling of accomplishments, services that are offered, quiet space
  • Engaging(x2) – expect the unexpected, place that offered new programs/ games, that will lead you to new opportunities outside of what brought you in the door
  • Something that catches your eye and makes you inspired to learn more.
  • Service – able to get exactly what you came in for, easy to find the appropriate section, knowledgeable staff to help
  • Excitement – excited to see what is new, bring you to new opportunities
  • Inviting(x2) – offers stuff that is new, and inviting to learn new opportunities, and an environment that creates a warm and fuzzy feeling
  • Nice – décor, color
  • Unique – bright colors that pop, and attract young people. Has a wow factor when you enter the door
  • Welcomed – you don’t feel like an intruder, if it’s someone’s first time visiting the library they are greeted, can find signage telling them where to go.
  • Opportunities - I’d like to see something that makes me feel excited to be here. “Wow, what am I going to do first?”  I want a plethora of possibilities.
  • Interesting exterior - thinking about the topography of the neighborhood and the various views – most of the buildings of Lamond Riggs neighborhood are two story brick structures – I don’t think the library should mimic the buildings around it.  I’d like it to pop – I really like how the Shaw Library looks, it makes you curious about what’s inside.
  • I like the Westend Library’s look but I’d like this library to be more energizing – the Westend Library does not flow. It doesn’t encourage you to browse.  It’s layout is more matter of fact, you have to know what you want and then know where to find it
  • Inclusiveness – the library should be for everyone. It shouldn’t just be a place for kids to play video games. It should show a bit of everything.
  • Amazing-(like the new Richmond, VA library) - they have defined spaces for different groups and each area is very welcoming. Also it is clearly labeled so a visitor knows where to go for different activities. Also a lot of natural light. It’s a place where you could stay all day long. (And Richmond has a swing outside, so you can swing and read
  • Indoor/outdoor space – you could read at a table or take your little one to play
  • A fixture in my community
  • Purposeful –I often go to Woodridge (not so much the design, but the programming) - investing in our youth with the programs offered. The staff are purposeful with the placement of the displays. (e.g., children’s are shorter so kids can see it) - clear signage and designs that allow visitors to navigate easily.
  • Educational-teaching job seekers to use the computer
  • Futuristic-I visit (the newer branches)  - they look revamped and have newer technology; some have a place to fix bikes, something for everyone, no matter what age. But here at L-R I don’t feel like I’ll get that. Everything is outdated and as we see additional development in our community, we are mindful of this space. So it should be dynamic and nimble. Maybe you need to open or close a wall to fit a different kind of meeting need.
  • Innovative
  • School partnerships
    • Kids know the library and their school are working hand and hand
  • Welcoming
    • Add beauty to the neighborhood
    • Safe place outside school hours
  • Community – The public square
    • Be around each other
    • Enrichments – concerts, talks, events
    • Meeting spaces for up to 100 people
    • Destination – space to relax by yourself
    • Peer to peer recommendations on books to read
  • Center for Learning
    • Lifelong learners – all ages can get new skills
    • Conduit for information
    • Bridge digital divide
    • Classes
  • A place for discovery
    • Inspire kids
    • Explore
Question 3: What experiences do you want to have at the new Lamond-Riggs Library that you cannot have today?
  • Things that are more interactive – similar to museums that have exhibits that engage and attract young people.
  • Café (x2) – place to get drink/snack
  • Conference space
  • Windows next to study spaces so you can look out and think
  • Place for community study
  • Shared work space (we work on the boards of community organizations)
  • Many different spaces for new technology, art technologies, recording space,
  • Inside Plantings, eco friendly,
  • Better use of terraces, balconies, rooftop garden, windows at eye level
  • Parking, and bicycle racks
  • Best area for arts to work with new community development across the street
  • Outreach media, that can promote media, and upcoming events, both inside directory board, and outside display for upcoming events
  • Attractive landscaping, sculptures, that create a sense of place, and can become a beacon for the neighborhood.
  • Rotating current events, that are displayed.
  • I use Frances Gregory – it’s bustling and the community is always using it – I would like to see a maker space because it draws all sorts of people.
  • I’d like the community room to be pleasant – this one feels like a prison.
  • I’m in this room a lot – it’s a wonky shape, the pillar is in the middle of the room, no windows. Meetings are always at either Lasalle-Backus, the old Backus building, or the Rec Center – they all have ugly uncomfortable rooms and it would be great to have meeting rooms that don’t put us all into bad moods before the meeting has even begun.
  • Outlets!!! I want outlets! There’s no place to plug in my laptop.
  • What about a café area?  I’d like a small café
  • Yes, me too – it’s too far to get to someplace from here
  • Continuation of the maker space. Digital commons like at MLK. Someone was trying to teach python and arduino but there wasn’t enough tables. 3-D printing. A place to learn how to build machines, and code
  • A defined space for different age groups. Without crossover. A place to maximize programming by having the rooms to support the programming. And much more engagement to promote the programming.
  • Dynamic meeting spaces. Smart spaces. A place for projecting, maybe a smart board. (I use the rec space for meetings because they have the technology but the library is easier to schedule.
  • Recording studios. Digital studio space. A place for performance art. Like Brooks Mansion that offers TV and sound production.
  • A college-friendly space. Because it’s different to study –a  space for books, maybe a port for laptop, a place to spread out when you’re studying. (with UDC next door, v important). Not a place where there is a computer right in middle of table, also the space should be apart from the chess players.
  • I like the library at ellicott city – a place with cubbies for me to go in my zone.
  • A sequestered quiet space. No noise.
  • Excellent HVAC / temperature control
  • Parking Access
  • Group Entertainment (ex. 30 Students)
    • Show a documentary, then have the students write on what they saw
    • Games
    • Videos
  • Meeting space with full AV
  • Flexibility in meeting space for moving chairs
  • Ability to enjoy outside space
    • Read
    • Play
    • Connection to plants / green space
  • Print homework
  • Scan documents
  • Be encouraged to stay – read a book in a comfy quiet chair & charging ports
  • Hold “Extra Large” sized meetings
  • Better Collection
  • Spaces that feel active, with energy
  • Meetups – Sharing skills peer to peer (writing, technical)
  • Space for parents and kids to be together reading – magazines for all
Space that allows variation in the noise level