The Line Becomes A River: Immigration Book Discussion Series with Lupita Reads

Mt. Pleasant Library

The Line Becomes A River: Immigration Book Discussion Series with Lupita Reads

Tuesday, April 30, 2019, 7 p.m.

Join Lupita Reads, Washington Performing Arts and DC Public Library to discuss The Line Becomes A River: Dispatches from the Border by Francisco Cantú. This event is part of a series celebrating the contributions and experiences of Latinx immigrants in the United States. The conversations will be led by Lupita Aquino—better known as “Lupita Reads”, herself a Mexican immigrant and co-founder/moderator for LIT on H St Book Club, hosted at Solid State Books. 

Francisco Cantú’s The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border was named a Top 10 Book of 2018 by NPR and The Washington Post, was shortlisted for the Andrew Carnegie Medal of Excellence, and was a finalist for the National Book Critic Circle’s John Leonard Prize. In the book he recounts the complexity of being a child of a Mexican immigrant and serving with U.S. Border Patrol. He witnesses the harsh conditions in which asylum-seekers navigate the border and is deeply affected by the role of the border in his own life and family origins.

“A must-read for anyone who thinks ‘build a wall’ is the answer to anything.” – Esquire

Discussion 1: The House of Broken Angels (2018) by Luis Alberto Urrea
Hosted by Politics & Prose
Politics and Prose Union Market, 1270 5th St NE, Washington, DC 20002
Tuesday, March 5 | 7 p.m.  

Discussion 2: The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border (2018) by Francisco Cantú
Hosted by DC Public Library
DC Public Library – Mt. Pleasant Neighborhood Library, 3160 16th St NW, Washington, DC 20010
Tuesday, April 30 | 7 p.m.

Discussion 3: Across a Hundred Mountains (2006) by Reyna Grande 
Hosted by Solid State Books
Solid State Books, 600 H St NE, Washington, DC 20002
Tuesday, May 7 | 7 p.m.
 
Throughout the 2018/19 season, Washington Performing Arts is collaborating with arts, cultural heritage, education, and literary partners throughout D.C. to facilitate a multi-disciplinary dialogue around the important contributions and experiences of Latinx immigrants in the United States. Musical performances, visual art displays, panel discussions, education programs, and a book discussion series together showcase the wide range of journeys of identity and place experienced by our Latinx neighbors.
 
The focal point is the March 17, 2019 premiere (via simulcast to Sidney Harman Hall) of Washington Performing Arts’ co-commission Dreamers, a new work for orchestra, soprano, and chorus by composer Jimmy López and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Nilo Cruz. Dreamers tells the story of several so-called “dreamers,” immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children and whose legal status is in jeopardy because their parents arrived in the U.S. undocumented. The fictional story is based on true testimonies that Cuban-American Cruz and Peruvian-American López have collected from immigrants who have come to the U.S. in search of a better life.
  
Co-presented by Washington Performing Arts’ Mars Urban Arts Initiative, DC Public Library, Politics & Prose, Solid State Books, and Lupita Reads. Made possible in part through the generous support of Jacqueline Badger Mars, Mars, Incorporated, Tom Gallagher, in honor of Turnaround, Inc., and Events DC.
 

Add to Calendar 30-04-2019 19:00:00 30-04-2019 20:00:00 The Line Becomes A River: Immigration Book Discussion Series with Lupita Reads Join Lupita Reads, Washington Performing Arts and DC Public Library to discuss The Line Becomes A River: Dispatches from the Border by Francisco Cantú. This event is part of a series celebrating the contributions and experiences of Latinx immigrants in the United States. The conversations will be led by Lupita Aquino—better known as “Lupita Reads”, herself a Mexican immigrant and co-founder/moderator for LIT on H St Book Club, hosted at Solid State Books.  Francisco Cantú’s The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border was named a Top 10 Book of 2018 by NPR and The Washington Post, was shortlisted for the Andrew Carnegie Medal of Excellence, and was a finalist for the National Book Critic Circle’s John Leonard Prize. In the book he recounts the complexity of being a child of a Mexican immigrant and serving with U.S. Border Patrol. He witnesses the harsh conditions in which asylum-seekers navigate the border and is deeply affected by the role of the border in his own life and family origins. “A must-read for anyone who thinks ‘build a wall’ is the answer to anything.” – Esquire Discussion 1: The House of Broken Angels (2018) by Luis Alberto Urrea Hosted by Politics & Prose Politics and Prose Union Market, 1270 5th St NE, Washington, DC 20002 Tuesday, March 5 | 7 p.m.   Discussion 2: The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border (2018) by Francisco Cantú Hosted by DC Public Library DC Public Library – Mt. Pleasant Neighborhood Library, 3160 16th St NW, Washington, DC 20010 Tuesday, April 30 | 7 p.m. Discussion 3: Across a Hundred Mountains (2006) by Reyna Grande  Hosted by Solid State Books Solid State Books, 600 H St NE, Washington, DC 20002 Tuesday, May 7 | 7 p.m.   Throughout the 2018/19 season, Washington Performing Arts is collaborating with arts, cultural heritage, education, and literary partners throughout D.C. to facilitate a multi-disciplinary dialogue around the important contributions and experiences of Latinx immigrants in the United States. Musical performances, visual art displays, panel discussions, education programs, and a book discussion series together showcase the wide range of journeys of identity and place experienced by our Latinx neighbors.   The focal point is the March 17, 2019 premiere (via simulcast to Sidney Harman Hall) of Washington Performing Arts’ co-commission Dreamers, a new work for orchestra, soprano, and chorus by composer Jimmy López and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Nilo Cruz. Dreamers tells the story of several so-called “dreamers,” immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children and whose legal status is in jeopardy because their parents arrived in the U.S. undocumented. The fictional story is based on true testimonies that Cuban-American Cruz and Peruvian-American López have collected from immigrants who have come to the U.S. in search of a better life.    Co-presented by Washington Performing Arts’ Mars Urban Arts Initiative, DC Public Library, Politics & Prose, Solid State Books, and Lupita Reads. Made possible in part through the generous support of Jacqueline Badger Mars, Mars, Incorporated, Tom Gallagher, in honor of Turnaround, Inc., and Events DC.   false DD/MM/YYYY