Book Hill Talks - How Do Cognitive Neuroscientists Study the Brain?

Georgetown Library

Book Hill Talks - How Do Cognitive Neuroscientists Study the Brain?

Wednesday, July 31, 2019, 7 p.m.

How do cognitive neuroscientists study the human brain?
 
Science has made many advances from the days when, after an accident like a stroke or injury, researchers would wait for the afflicted person to die so that they could remove their brain and determine what had gone wrong that led to the person's symptoms. One amazing modern tool for understanding the human brain is magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI. Using MRI, neuroscientists can study the brain of living individuals in a non-invasive way. In this seminar, we will talk about how MRI is used to measure brain structure and function, both healthy and unhealthy. We will also cover some of the landmark studies that showcased the power of this tool for learning about how the brain changes with experience, and how the brain works to carry out complex functions like understanding language.
 
Breana Downey is a fifth year PhD candidate in the Interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience at Georgetown University. She earned her bachelors degrees in Neuroscience and Spanish from the University of Pittsburgh prior to coming to Georgetown. Currently, she studies how the experience of bilingualism impacts the brain systems for math, by comparing brain activity during addition and subtraction in English and Spanish, and comparing the bilingual brain to the monolingual brain as children and adults do arithmetic inside an MRI scanner. 

Add to Calendar 31-07-2019 19:00:00 31-07-2019 20:00:00 Book Hill Talks - How Do Cognitive Neuroscientists Study the Brain? How do cognitive neuroscientists study the human brain?   Science has made many advances from the days when, after an accident like a stroke or injury, researchers would wait for the afflicted person to die so that they could remove their brain and determine what had gone wrong that led to the person's symptoms. One amazing modern tool for understanding the human brain is magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI. Using MRI, neuroscientists can study the brain of living individuals in a non-invasive way. In this seminar, we will talk about how MRI is used to measure brain structure and function, both healthy and unhealthy. We will also cover some of the landmark studies that showcased the power of this tool for learning about how the brain changes with experience, and how the brain works to carry out complex functions like understanding language.   Breana Downey is a fifth year PhD candidate in the Interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience at Georgetown University. She earned her bachelors degrees in Neuroscience and Spanish from the University of Pittsburgh prior to coming to Georgetown. Currently, she studies how the experience of bilingualism impacts the brain systems for math, by comparing brain activity during addition and subtraction in English and Spanish, and comparing the bilingual brain to the monolingual brain as children and adults do arithmetic inside an MRI scanner.  false DD/MM/YYYY