World War II Espionage for the 75th Anniversary of D-Day

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World War II Espionage for the 75th Anniversary of D-Day

June 6, 2019, is the 75th anniversary of World War II’s D-Day which ultimately led to the Nazi’s defeat. D-Day was a massive military invasion that was both supported and opposed by new and growing intelligence operations on both sides. Explore the intelligence efforts and learn about some of the interesting spies working in espionage during World War II with these books.
 
Agent 110: An American Spymaster and the German Resistance in WWII by Scott Miller
Meet Allen Dulles – the airport is named after his brother – a spy who worked with the secret German resistance to try to kill Hitler, stop the Nazis, end the war, and keep the Soviets from gaining power in a post-World War II Germany. Dulles would go on to head the CIA.
 
Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare: The Mavericks Who Plotted Hitler's Defeat by Giles Milton
Formally known as the Special Operations Executive, this secret group led by men we may not have heard of today - Cecil Clarke, William Fairbarn, Colin Gubbins, Millis Jefferis – but they were responsible for the men and women who completed much of the British espionage, sabotage, assassination, and infiltration that happened in World War II.
 
Writer, Sailor, Soldier, Spy: Ernest Hemingway's Secret Adventures, 1935-1961 by Nicholas Reynolds
For the literary history readers, Reynolds traces Hemingway’s activities from the Spanish Civil War to World War II and through the revolution in Cuba working first with the Russians and then with the United States in a multitude of roles including the liberation of Paris from Nazis.
 
The Secret History of World War II: Spies, Code Breakers & Covert Operations by Neil Kagan and Stephen G. Hyslop
Featuring significant levels of photographs, graphics, and other illustrations, Hyslop and Kagan bring National Geographic’s emphasis on combining excellent historical research paired with visual engagement to draw readers into both a broad and detailed depiction of espionage in World War II.
 
The Last Goodnight: A World War II Story of Espionage, Adventure, and Betrayal by Howard Blum
With a narrative that reads more like a fictional suspense novel, The Last Goodnight portrays the life and espionage activities of Betty Pack, American born wife of British diplomat Arthur Pack, who was called an “unsung heroine of the war” by one top ranking American spy. 
 
The Secret War: Spies, Ciphers, and Guerrillas 1939-1945 by Max Hastings
Exceptionally detailed research combines with a thriller-like narrative in The Secret War. Hastings takes a broader look at the intelligence arena in World War II than some other books on the list discussing British, American, German, Russian and Japanese operations in espionage and information gathering.