Story Tags

Black and white photo of author Octavia Butler. The author is slightly smiling.

Octavia's Kin

The Lineage of Science Fiction/Fantasy Writers from the African Diaspora

The historical lack of gender and racial diversity among authors promoted by the Science Fiction/Fantasy book industry has not destroyed the creative imaginations of writers of African descent who embrace the genre. Black Science Fiction/Fantasy writers do indeed exist and have a kaleidoscope of stories to add to the field.

An image of the profile of a young, dark skinned Black woman with large stone beads around her neck and fossil balls in her curly black hair.

Black Future Month Happy Hour

Join our Community Read & follow up with a fun chat

It is both Black History Month and Black Future Month at DC Public Library, so don't miss our Black Future Month Happy Hour! Join our Community Read of author N.K. Jemisin's How Long 'Til Black Future Month? On Friday, Feb. 19 at 6 p.m., we'll chat and share insights as we explore the worlds within Jemisin's short stories together.

Martin Luther King at DC Parade

Celebrating "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" Podcast

Annual MLK Library tradition returns as a virtual event

Pictured: Martin Luther King, Jr. with his son, Martin Luther King III, and Walter Fauntroy on March 12, 1967 in a convertible at the start of a parade at Dunbar High School that ended at Cardozo High School. King was in D.C. to promote Fauntroy's MICCO program and Shaw neighborhood development.

Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All its Phases by Ida B. Wells

Ida B.Wells:Telling the Truth and Sharing the Story

Read the Writing of a 'Courageous Black Woman Journalist'

We've seen racial injustice captured online. We've watched uprisings on cell phone video. This sort of democratized reporting highlights the reality of racism and the importance of storytelling.  But before the cell phone, there was Ida B. Wells.

book cover

African American Poetry for Children

The triumphs and tragedies of the African American experience are discussed in these illustrated poetry collections. Studies show that reading and writing poetry helps children develop vocabulary, phonetic awareness and an ability to talk constructively about their feelings. Please see the Library's Black Studies database collection to find additional information about African American history.

Binti

Strong Black Female Leads

  "The man may be the head but the women is the neck."- Maria Portokalos, My Big Fat Greek Wedding

Bronze coin-shaped medal suspended on a multicolored ribbon.

Honoring Your Service: African Americans in the Military

A Black History Month Event featuring a day-long series of programs honoring Black Vets

On Saturday, Feb. 22, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m., Woodridge Library will celebrate African American Veterans with a day-long series of activities: Tell Your Story Participate in the Library of Congress' Veteran's History Project by contributing to the audio archive. Trained interviewers will be available to take oral histories from participants. For an appointment, please contact David Quick at david.quick2@dc.gov. Precious Objects

Still I Rise

Graphic Novels For Black History Month

Black History Month provides endless opportunities to fine tune your reading, focus on certain aspects of the world or culture, and grow as a reader. Take it a step further by diving into these eight graphic novels that are ideal reading for Black History Month or anyone interested anytime in black history, black stories, or black storytellers. 

Malcolm X

"Don’t be in a hurry to condemn because he doesn’t do what you do or think as you think or as fast. There was a time when you didn’t know what you know today.” - Malcolm X

"We declare our right on this earth to be a human being, to be respected as a human being, to be given the rights of a human being in this society, on this earth, in this day, which we intend to bring into existence by any means necessary."  - Speech at the founding of the Organization of Afro-American Unity, 1964  

Harriet

31st Annual Black Film Festival

The DC Public Library presents  31st Annual Black Film Festival Every Tuesday evening in February, starting at 6 p.m. at Georgetown Library Feb. 4 Harriet: The incredible true story of Harriet Tubman, and her quest to lead hundreds of slaves to freedom on the Underground Railroad. Directed by Kasi Lemmons. 2019, 125 minutes, rated PG-13. Feb. 11

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