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Exterior of Washingtoniana Interim

​Washingtoniana Walk-In Hours

In order to improve access during the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library modernization, we've expanded walk-in hours to match our open hours:   Sunday & Monday: Closed Tuesday & Thursday: 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Wednesday & Friday: 9:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. First and third Saturdays of each month: 9:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.  

Finger pointing at a historic plat map

Educators & Students

Now that Washingtoniana has settled into its new interim location, we'd like to invite groups of educators and students from around the city to visit and discover all that our division has to offer. Our collections contain a number of resources that may be useful in the classroom or for specific research projects, such as:   Photographs Maps Books on DC history Vertical files and newspapers Building permits and directories Genealogy and house history resources Archival collections

Barnett Aden Gallery Evening Star newspaper article from October 15, 1943

Barnett Aden Gallery 75th Anniversary: A Conversation with David C. Driskell

October marked the 75th anniversary of the historic Barnett Aden Gallery. Founded by Alonzo Aden and James V. Herring of Howard University and located at 127 Randolph Place NW, it was the first privately-owned black gallery in the United States. The gallery featured the works of artists such as Alma Thomas, Elizabeth Catlett, Lois Mailou Jones and Aaron Douglas. 

The Intelligencer

The Intelligencer

Special Collections' Newsletter

Want to stay up-to-date on all the latest happenings in Special Collections? Consider signing up for our newsletter, The Intelligencer! Sent via e-mail every three weeks, The Intelligencer covers collection updates, interim services, and upcoming programs and events for Washingtoniana, the DC Community Archives, the Peabody Room at Georgetown Neighborhood Library, and the Black Studies Center.

CERCLA graphic

Spring Valley Information Repository

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

The Spring Valley Formerly Used Defense Site (FUDS) consists of approximately 660 acres in the northwest section of Washington, D.C. During the World War I‐era, the site was known as the American University Experiment Station, and was used by the U.S. government for research and testing of chemical agents, equipment and munitions. Today, the site encompasses approximately 1,600 private properties, including several embassies and foreign properties, as well as the American University and Wesley Seminary.

A Year in Rock Creek Park

DC's Wild, Wondrous Heart

Ecological, Historical & Poetic Explorations of Rock Creek Park

When many people think of our nation's capital, they focus on its political life. Yet residents here know our city environment encompasses much more than federal politics. At its heart lies my favorite area, Rock Creek Park. Over double the size of Central Park, it includes forests, streams, hills, fields, recreational and historical sites. Here residents and tourists can escape from urban stress, slow down, engage in recreation, and commune with nature.

heavens might crack

50 Years Ago

New Books about America in 1968

We are now 50 years out from the tumultuous events of 1968. DC Public Library is focusing on the ways in which events of that year resulted in the city and country we know today. Authors and publishers are doing the same, publishing a plethora of books about what happened in America during that time. While it's a year that has already had a lot of historical gaze fixed upon it, many of the new books are bringing fresh perspectives to that time.

Cracker!

DC Reads for Children and Teens

Starting a conversation about war, refugees, and immigrants

May is here, and that means DC Reads has begun. Throughout the month of May, our One City-One Book program encourages D.C. residents to read, discuss and connect around one book. This year's title is The Refugees by Viet Thanh Nguyen, Pulitzer Prize-winner and newly appointed member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. 

George Derek Musgrove

Author Talk: George Derek Musgrove

Many books have been written about the politics and history of Washington, D.C. However the city's hometown aspect frequently is overlooked.

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