Story Tags

The Lottery cover image

Short and Spicy

Short Story Collections by Women Writers

These short story collections by women writers, presented in order of publication date, bring us sharp and refreshing perspectives from around the world.   The Lottery and Other Stories by Shirley Jackson

So You've Been Publicly Shamed

"Right to Be Forgotten"

A reading list for the Arena Stage Production

What is “the right to be forgotten?"  Besides the name of the play coming to Arena Stage in October, it is also a legal right in much of Europe, which allows individuals to apply to media and internet companies to have links to past indiscretions like debts and small crimes erased from search results. Advocates claim utility for people like victims of revenge porn, while those opposed contend it can allow history to be re-written and violates free speech rights.

The Brief History of the Dead

So, You’ve Died. Now What?

Recently I was watching Beetlejuice, and I found the way death was handled to be a fascinating idea. Initially the Maitland family are unaware that they’re even dead. Nobody tells them. They’re just given a handbook, and limited number of visits with a caseworker to get things figured out as they hang out in their home.

anna karenina

Romance with a Compelling Setting

One of the most essential principles of books that delve into the different ways we love people is that the book needs to be felt. Part of what makes that happen are the characters themselves: how realistically they are portrayed and how well the author is able to make them feel human, or how much of an affinity they have to our own sensibilities (or to what we can imagine as readers). These affinities ground themselves in the characters, but also in the settings of the books.

The Age of Innocence

Women's History Pulitzer Picks

Exceptional fiction from exceptional women

The Pulitzer Prize (Fiction) is a prestigious honor that acknowledges groundbreaking work in the literary world. As Women's History Month is celebrated all throughout the month of March, please consider these award winning titles that are available at DC Public Library.  The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton

Bring Me Back book cover

Well Read Ears

Noteworthy Audiobook Performances

Did you know that audiobooks are one of the fasting growing ways to read a book? If this is news to you, welcome to your new obsession! There’s no better way to multi-task while cooking, driving, working out or when you can’t easily keep your eyes on the page. Audiobooks have come a long way from “books-on-tape,” and the library has lots of ways to enjoy them.

Cover for the book "Here Comes the Sun"

Almost Like Being There

Fiction with a Strong Sense of Place

Maybe you’ve been itching to take a trip but don’t have the time or the funds; maybe you have a trip on the horizon but need a break from the day-to-day; or maybe you prefer the comfort of your own home or hometown, but love reading about far off places. Sometimes there’s nothing like fiction to paint such a clear picture of a place that it’s almost as good as traveling there yourself.

The Gap of Time cover

Retelling Shakespeare

Shakespeare Retold To mark the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death, Hogarth Press commissioned several acclaimed and popular contemporary authors to write novels retelling a Shakespeare play of their choice. Shakespeare fans will easily recognize the characters, plots and familiar themes of jealousy, ambition, revenge and the destructive and redemptive power of love.

Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys

What to Read after "The Yellow Wallpaper"

Read-Alikes and Contextual Texts

Published in 1892, “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman has left a lasting impression on readers interested in feminism and mental health. While Gilman’s is one of the better-known stories about women, mental health and their treatment in western society, many authors have also approached the subjects before and since its publication.

My Sister the Serial Killer by Okinkan Braithwaite

Not Your Dream Girl

Fall in love with some weird, rude, gross and otherwise complex ladies in these insightful page-turners, all written by female authors.

Podcaster Whitney Reynolds lit Twitter on fire when she suggested that women describe themselves as a male author would.

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