Story Tags

Barefoot in Babylon by Bob Spitz

Peace, Love, and Rock 'n' Roll

Celebrating Woodstock 50 years later

August 15, 2019 marks 50 years since the first Woodstock in Bethel, N.Y. Revisit inimitable acts such as The Who, Jimi Hendrix and The Grateful Dead to celebrate the enormous cultural impact the “three days of peace and music” had on America and the world. From nonfiction tell-alls from those who had a hand in organizing the festival to young adult novels written from today’s perspective, there’s something groovy for everyone here.

The Bullet Journal Method by Ryder Carroll

7 Books to Up Your Bullet Journal Game

Over the last several years, you may have heard about the concept of “bullet journals.” Developed by Ryder Carroll, these books, which are sort of hybrids of a traditional journal and a planner, are one of the best modern ways of organizing your life and thoughts.

American Panda by Gloria Chao

Beyond To All the Boys I've Loved Before

Asian American Young Adult Novels

Readers may have been noticing something of a Korean American young adult fiction boom the last year or so, and they’re not imagining it.

Fall in Line HOlden by Daniel Vandever

#OwnVoices in Indigenous Picture Books

While there’s a wealth of picture books depicting the Native American experience, many of them are by white authors. The importance of #OwnVoices works, particularly when it comes to pieces for children who may not yet have the skills to determine what is an accurate portrayal of Native life and culture, is clear.

Bone Gap by Laura Ruby

Young Adult Fabulism

7 stories of magic grounded in reality

Fairy tales aren’t just for children. These seven young adult novels will chill teens and adults alike with spooky and haunting bits of magic and fables woven into reality. From a man who moves like corn stalks to a journal that takes its writers to an impossible past in the now, these books will make you want to settle in for the weekend and explore their strange, strange worlds.

The Selection by Kiera Cass

Royalty Gone Awry

Hard times for royals in fiction

As Lorde sings, “we’ll never be royals,” and maybe it’s for the best. This list includes stories of the royal life not being all it’s cracked up to be. Although we might have dreamed of running our own kingdoms as kids, now fiction tells us how fraught that experience would be. Enjoy your peasant status while you read about stressful politics, assassination, kidnapping and other trials in the court.

All Summer Long by Hope Larson

Feels Like Summer

YA and Children's fiction with summer vibes for all ages

Summertime, and the livin’ is easy… The weather is starting to warm up, but it’s not quite summer yet. If you’re yearning for those hot-hot days and warm nights around the campfire, visit June, July and August through these stories. These YA and juvenile reads are great for their target audience -- and adults too!

Luz sees the light cover

Graphic Novels and Nonfiction to Share with Kids

Connect with little literatis through graphic works

Sometimes, the best way to connect with the kids in your life is over a good book. But you might be wondering what constitutes a good book when it comes to little literatis. Fear not, the Children’s Librarian is here! Below, find six great graphic novels (and two graphic format nonfiction) to share with kids, whether you’re looking to start a conversation or just want a good story.

Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys

What to Read after "The Yellow Wallpaper"

Read-Alikes and Contextual Texts

Published in 1892, “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman has left a lasting impression on readers interested in feminism and mental health. While Gilman’s is one of the better-known stories about women, mental health and their treatment in western society, many authors have also approached the subjects before and since its publication.

Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows by Balli Kaur Jaswal

How to Read Like a Librarian

Peek at our staff's reading list

There are a lot of librarian stereotypes out there: we’re all women (false), we’re all either uptight and impersonal or coding nerds with tattoos (false), we like to shush people (false), and we have either read everything in the library or we only read books you’d find on lists of importance (definitely false and false).

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